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Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Potential new crops, crambe, 1970-1987 found in the catalog.

Potential new crops, crambe, 1970-1987

Evelyn A. Brownlee

Potential new crops, crambe, 1970-1987

166 citations

by Evelyn A. Brownlee

  • 225 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plant breeding -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by: Evelyn Brownlee.
    GenreBibliography.
    SeriesQuick bibliography series -- NAL-BIBL. QB 88-12., Quick bibliography series -- 88-12.
    ContributionsNational Agricultural Library (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination5, 8, [1] p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17564245M

    Rapeseed is now the second largest oilseed crop after soybean, and the third largest vegetable oil after soybean oil and palm oil, and it is therefore an important contributor to the annual supply of vegetable oils required to meet an increasing demand. This volume provides comprehensive coverage of rapeseed oil and its close relative, canola oil, from production (agronomic) aspects, through. Background. The allohexaploid Crambe abyssinica (crambe) is an oilseed crop that has been recognized for its potential value in the chemical industry, particularly in terms of producing high-erucic acid content vegetable oil. However, as an understudied crop, improvement of crambe has been hampered by the lack of genetic and genomic information to enhance its yield, oil quality and Cited by:

      The low developmental threshold confirmed that crambe is a cool climate crop (Papathanasiou and Lessman, ). Crambe may also be tolerant to freezing since Johnson et al. () reported that crambe shortly after the emergence can withstand temperatures of [degrees] C. [Figure 1 ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Table 1. Background. Crambe abyssinica (crambe) is a non-food oil seed crop. Its seed oil is widely used in the chemical industry because of the high erucic acid content. Furthermore, it is a potential platform for various feedstock oils for industrial uses based on genetic by: 8.

    Crambe oil is sourced from the plant seed Crambe Abyssinica and contains up to 60% erucic acid – a valuable raw material used in the production of a wide range of high-value oleochemical derivatives including polymers, polymer additives, surfactants, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Crambe is a member of the crucifer family which includes crops [ ]. Over potential new crops are presently being explored in Europe. Some of these crops are cultivated to a limited extent whereas others are only grown in the framework of demonstration projects. Interest in new crop development has increased tremendously in Europe during the last five years.


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Potential new crops, crambe, 1970-1987 by Evelyn A. Brownlee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Potential new crops, crambe, citations. [Evelyn A Brownlee; National Agricultural Library (U.S.)]. Get this from a library. Potential new crop: crambe: January - December [Jerry Rafats; National Agricultural Library (U.S.)].

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Open Library.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http Author: Evelyn A.

Brownlee. Potential New Crop: Kenaf, Commercial Fiber & Pulp Source. January - June TITLE: Potential New Crop: Kenaf, Commercial Fiber & Pulp Source AUTHOR: Jerry Rafats Reference and User Services Branch National Agricultural Library PUBLICATION DATE: July SERIES: QB NAL Call no.: aZN3 no CONTACT: Alternative Farming Systems Information Center.

Culture of Crambe: A New Industrial Oilseed Crop, Issues George Albert White, Joseph John Higgins Agricultural Research Service, U.S.

Department of Agriculture, - Crambe abyssinica. Title: CRAMBE: A Potential New Crop for Indiana Author: E. Christmas, K. Lessman, C. Southard, and M. Phillips Keywords: crambe Created Date. Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst), belonging to the family Brassicaceae, is an annual oilseed crop.

Its seeds contain up to 38% oil and the main fatty acid in the seed oil is erucic acid with about 60%.

Since erucic acid is an important feedstock in the oleochemical industry, mainly used as slip agent in plastic production, the natural high level of erucic acid in the seed oil makes crambe a suitable Cited by: 5. Market and agronomic research on crambe' s potential as a new crop is being conducted by the Crops Research Division, Agricultural Research Service, Belts- ville, Md.; the Northern Utilization Research and Development Laboratory, Agri- cultural Research Service, Peoria.

Machinery used for tillage, planting, spraying, and harvesting crambe is similar to that used for small grains. Farmers producing small grains would not have to purchase additional machinery to produce crambe.

Incrambe yielding (1, lb/acre— kg/acre) in the Midwest cost $/lb-$/kg to produce. Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst), belonging to the family Brassicaceae, is an annual oilseed crop.

Its seeds contain up to 38% oil and the main fatty acid in the seed oil is erucic acid with. Abstract. Compared with other Brassica crops, such as rapeseed (Brassica napus), B. rapa, B. oleracea, or B.

juncea, the genus Crambe L. is still under development as an agricultural crop and is not widely grown. In some species, utilization as an herbaceous or root vegetable is known since several centuries. Thus Crambe maritima, known as sea-kale, is a traditional vegetable in its growing.

Culture of Crambe: A New Industrial Oilseed Crop, Numéros 95 à George Albert White, Joseph John Higgins Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, - 20 pages. Abstract. Crambe abyssinica Hochst is an oilseed of the family Brassicaceae, rich in oil with important properties for chemical applications.

It is comprised of monounsaturated fatty acids (erucic, palmitoleic, oleic, gadoleic and nervonic acids) and antioxidants like phytosterols, tocopherols, carotenoids and : Caroline Mariana de Aguiar, Kátia Andressa Santos, Sílvio César Sampaio, Clayton Antunes Martin.

Papas et al. () found that feed intake, milk yield, protein, fat, andsolids were not affected by replacing soybean meal with rapeseed mealcontaining either 94 or 50 µmol/g of glucosinolates. However, the higherglucosinolate meal reduced iodine content of the milk and tended to.

This book provides a comprehensive view of key oil crops that provide products used for fuel, surfactants, paints and coatings, lubricants, high-value polymers, safe plasticizers and numerous other products, all of which compete effectively with petroleum-derived products for quality and cost.

Specific products derived from oil crops are a principle concern, and other fundamental aspects of developing oil crops. Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex R. Fries) has potential as a new oilseed crambe is not winter hardy, an experiment was conducted at Experiment, Ga. to study the effects of spring planting dates and row spacing on agronomic characteristics and chemical composition of the seed.

P.I. was spring seeded in and at four 1‐week intervals in three row spacings, C. abyssinica is an oil crop with high levels (55–60%) of erucic acid () in its seed has been proposed as an ideal crop for producing oil qualities intended for industrial purposes [14,15] and is currently developed for several purposes, for example, increased content and production of a novel wax containing oil [16 •].Erucic acid is an added-value fatty acid, and its Author: Rodomiro Ortiz, Mulatu Geleta, Cecilia Gustafsson, Ida Lager, Per Hofvander, Christer Löfstedt, Edga.

Crambe (Crambe abyssinica Hochst. ex R. Fr.) is a cruciferous oil plant that can be grown as a winter or spring crop (Falasca et al., ).It has low cultivation costs and can be mechanically harvested (Falasca et al., ).Crambe is mainly grown for its oil and.

Book. Jan ; Jeremy D Allison; Ring T Cardé Crambe oil - A potential new hydraulic oil and quenchant. Article. Camelina may serve as a potential industrial crop to produce novel. ×Close. The Infona portal uses cookies, i.e.

strings of text saved by a browser on the user's device. The portal can access those files and use them to remember the user's data, such as their chosen settings (screen view, interface language, etc.), or their login data.Oil crop breeding is facing various challenges as compared with the improvement of other species: Most oil crops have a shorter cropping history than cereals, legumes, or forage species.

Novel oil crops include jatropha, pongamia, lesquerella and cuphea, camelina, and by: Crambe abyssinica is an annual oilseed crop of the family Brassicaceae. It is mainly cultivated due to the high levels of erucic acid that are contained in its seeds. The crambe oil is used for industrial purposes and its side products can be partly used as animal : Brassicaceae.